Tag Archives: candles

Habari Gani? Imani!

1 Jan

Imani means faith!

Light the previous candles and in same way and order as the previous nights, then light the remaining green candle. The last candle! This is the last night, guys! It’s also New Year’s. 🙂

Discuss faith and what this personally means to you (whatever religion you practice or if you don’t practice a religion…this is personal to you). After that call out “Harambee!” seven times. Then, guess what you do? You give zawadi (gifts) to immediate family members to encourage growth, self-determination, achievement, and success, and promote or reward accomplishments and commitments kept. Haha, gotcha!! Gifts are usually handmade (self-determination, purpose, and creativity, remember?) When you accept the gift, you’re implying that you’re willing to follow through with the principles taught during Kwanzaa. And uh…then you eat! ^_^ You knew it was coming.

This has been a Kwanzaa celebration with me, thanks for joining, and I hope to see you next year :).

Advertisements

Habari Gani? Kuumba!

31 Dec

Kuumba means creativity!

Light the previous candles and in same way and order as the previous nights, then light the remaining red candle.

Kuumba means to strive to do as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful than we inherited it. Discuss what creativity means to you and how it plays a role in your life. Now today, today there’s a special FEAST! It’s called Karamu. Everyone drinks thetambiko (libation: water, juice, or wine…whatever you want) from the unity cup to promote UNITY, but save some in there for the ancestors. Then the eldest person there pours some in all directions (North, South, East, and West) to honour them. Then, they ask the ancestors to come celebrate with everyone and to bless everyone who isn’t present. Then they pour the rest on the ground and say Amen. This part can be modified to fit your setting. Then…you FEAST, duh! It’s New Year’s Eve, guys!

Habari Gani? Nia!

30 Dec

Nia means purpose!

Light the previous candles and in same way and order as the previous nights, then light the second candle from the right. The green one!

After lighting the candles, discuss what purpose means to you. Then grub on some food, you guys! Oh yeah, grab some drums, play some music. People usually do that at Kwanzaa, too. Silly me…I forgot to mention that sooner. You all have been missing out! Sorry!!!

Habari Gani? Ujamaa!

29 Dec

Ujamaa means cooperative economics!

Light the previous candles and in same way and order as the previous nights, then light the second candle from the left. The red one!

This principle is about building and maintaining stores, shops, and other businesses and profiting from them together. Discuss what this means to you. Then guess what you do? You betcha! Eat. ^_^

Habari Gani? Ujima!

28 Dec

Ujima means collective work and responsibility!

Light the previous candles in the same order that you lit them before, and then light the green candle on the far right using the black candle.

Ujima means to build and maintain out community together, and make others’ struggles and problems our own so that we may solve them together. We reflect on what this means to us…then we eat, ha! See a theme?

Sad that Christmas is Over and There’s Nothing to Celebrate Until New Year’s?

25 Dec
Celebrate Kwanzaa!! I do! haha

Celebrate Family, Community, and Culture with me…All Cultures, mmk? Yes, Kwanzaa has roots in the black nationalist movement, and is founded in the African culture. The terms are in Swahili, but I am a multilingual African-American girl of many cultures, so I’m celebrating the holiday while embracing ALL cultures AND religions…so EVERYONE feel free to celebrate with me :).

The Nguzu Saba: The Seven Principles

Kwanzaa is seven days long. Each day represents a different principle, as you will see over the next week. It’s always celebrated from December 26th through January 1st.

  1. Umoja: Unity
  2. Kujichagulia: Self-Determination
  3. Ujima: Collective Work and Responsibility
  4. Ujamaa: Cooperative Economics
  5. Nia: Purpose
  6. Kuumba: Creativity
  7. Imani: Faith

The seven symbols used during Kwanzaa

  1. Mazao: Crops, Fruits, Vegetables
  2. Vibunzi: Ear of Corn
  3. Mkeka: Placemat
  4. Mishumaa Saba: The Seven Candles
  5. Kinara: The Candleholder
  6. Kikombe Cha Umoja: The Unity Cup
  7. Zawadi: Gifts

So What do I do?

A common greeting is Jambo! The celebration starts each day with inviting your loved ones who’ve passed away to celebrate with you, and then someone says Habari Gani? That means What’s the News? The reply to that question is the principle for that day. Details for each specific day will be posted that morning.